Music in Prophecy

In II Kings 3, three kings – of Israel, Judea, and Edom – advance to war with Moab. On they way they stop to inquire of the Lord by Elisha, the disciple and successor of Elijah. Elisha, angry at the sin of these three kings, says to Jehoram, the son of Ahab and Jezebel, “What do I have to do with you? Go to the prophets of your father and to the prophets of your mother!”

At the insistence of Jehoshaphat, Elisha will inquire of the Lord. Yet, he makes an unusual request, “Now, bring me a musician.” As soon as the musician began to play, the hand of the Lord came upon him, and he began to prophesy. Why?

Elisha was furious over the idolatrous sin of Jehoram, and in that anger the door of prophesy was closed to him. Anger disrupts and prevents the stillness of heart/mind needed to receive prophecy. Elisha knew that in order to hear the voice of God that he had to let go of his wrath, and open his heart to heaven in order to receive from the still small voice of God.

Music, skillfully played by a prophetic spirit-filled heart, opens the door for the prophetic – true prophetic words. Without melody to attune the worshipper to the worshipful melody of heaven, anger not only clouds prophecy, it distorts reality.

This is why prophecy must be saturated in melody; and why Elisha requested a musician. The music opened Elisha to prophecy, and to speaks words of truth even when in his flesh he despised the actions of Jehoram. Elisha recognized that there is timing for the Lord’s plan, and in our limited view we are unable to fully appreciate all that the Lord is setting in place.

Inspired music will settle the heart, and allow the plan of God to unfold not by our interference, but with our faithful commitment to His will.

Be well. Shalom.

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